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Olive Uprights! First Invertebrate Sample Results from Deculverted Porter Brook by SPRITE (Sheffield's Trout in the Town affiliated group)


I'm very pleased to be able to say that life is starting to recolonise after the extensive works to open up the culverted section of the Porter Brook at Matilda Street.

It was a delight to receive the photos on Twitter showing some of the aquatic creatures that are beginning to colonise the daylighted section of channel.



Some of the different beasties that have already moved in include Baetidae (agile darter nymphs), Gammaridae (freshwater shrimp), Heptageniidae (flat "stone-clinging" mayfly nymphs), as well as Oligochaete worms, Caseless caddis of the Hydropsyche and Rhyacophila genuses.

Hopefully the newly-created variation in channel depth, velocity and structure will provide lots of opportunities for more species and individuals for a long time to come.

If you live within striking distance of Sheffield and you want to get in on future invertebrate monitoring and other works in the streams and rivers of the city, you can email them on sheffieldsprite@gmail.com and also see their website at http://www.sheffieldsprite.com/

Comments

Baslowfisher said…
Unbelievable considering the location of this, nature is certainly an incredible thing to be able to re-colonise after such a short time. Well done to you and also Sheffield Council for getting this done.
Regular Rod said…
Back in the '80s I made some photographs of what passed for the Porter Brook and included them in an exhibition to try and prick the consciences of local folk but without any real hope of remedial action. It was just a photographic rant. SPRITE, on the other hand, has really achieved something special here...



RR

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